Installation & New Media

The Next Great American Pop Icon Will Spring Fully Formed From the Head of Zeus
C33 Gallery, October 30 - November 14, 2014

THE NEXT GREAT AMERICAN POP ICON WILL SPRING FULLY FORMED FROM THE HEAD OF ZEUS was a durational, sculptural performance through which I developed the character of Elektra Day, a fictional pop star inspired by both the pantheon of popular music icons and the tragedies of classical Greece. (The biography and creative output of this character would go on to be the basis of the multimedia project Elektra Day - Last Nights.) I spent hours in the gallery each day, improvising elements of the character: how she dresses, does her hair, paints her face, carries her body, speaks, sings, dances, poses, writes, breathes, thinks. This performative sketching process was also constantly filmed and reviewed as I manipulated myself as live sculpture, using costume, set, prop, makeup, movement, and sound. Images by Sid Branca, BJ Allen, and Julia Dratel. 


There is an avenue down which I go
Columbia College Chicago, December 2013


Radio Radio Radio
Columbia College Chicago, Spring 2013

Radio Radio Radio was an interactive sound installation and performance that took place during Columbia College Chicago Open Studios. Created using Max/MSP, Soundflower, and MIDI controllers, it allowed me and members of the audience to manipulate audio from Chicago area police scanners and popular radio stations. Images by Leo Selvaggio.


Sonnets

  Kellen Walker attending  Sonnets . Image by Megan Pitcher.

Kellen Walker attending Sonnets. Image by Megan Pitcher.

Sonnets was an experiment in dislocated performance, in performance that must be completed by the spectator/participant in a specific set of physical and mediatized circumstances. The Sonnet shown above, for example, is distributed as the following set of instructions:

Go to a public bathroom. Look in the mirror. Continue to look. Call (###) ###-####.

Calling the (now inactive) phone number leads the listener to a voicemail recording of Shakespeare Sonnet 138.